Letters

BMA negotiator calls for more male medical students

BMJ 2002; 324 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.324.7351.1453/a (Published 15 June 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;324:1453

Working women seem to be scapegoats in medicine

  1. Susan Walker (walksh30@genie.co.uk), locum general practitioner
  1. Brooklands Avenue Medical Centre, 7 Brooklands Avenue, Cambridge CB2 2BB
  2. Klinik Dr Madeleine, Damai Point, Kota Kinabalu, 88 764 Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia

    EDITOR—It seems that sexism is operating in the BMA. Holden says that there is a sound case for biasing medical selection in favour of male applicants because “you do not get 35-40 years of service from the females.”1

    It is a biological fact that women have babies and therefore take some time off work. Holden would solve the problem of understaffing in medicine by preventing women entering the medical profession in such large numbers. Let us follow this line of reasoning to its logical conclusion.

    It is a biological fact that diabetes and heart disease are more prevalent in people with a south Asian ethnic background.2 Many Asian doctors die of cardiovascular disease while in service, before reaching their retirement age. Is Holden going to suggest that medical schools …

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