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Spain sets up inquiry after use of frozen eggs for in vitro fertilisation

BMJ 2002; 324 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.324.7347.1178/a (Published 18 May 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;324:1178
  1. Xavier Bosch
  1. Barcelona

    The Spanish health ministry has started an inquiry after the announcement by an infertility institute that it had used frozen eggs to achieve pregnancies. The current law, which dates back to 1988, allows the freezing of embryos but not the freezing of women's eggs.

    The Barcelona based Institute of Human Reproduction (Cefer), which in 1979 created the first Spanish sperm bank, claimed last week that four women had become pregnant after in vitro fertilisation of previously frozen eggs.

    Dr Simón Marina, the institute's director, told the national press that eggs started to be thawed at the institute last November. …

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