Letters

Road traffic injuries are a global public health problem

BMJ 2002; 324 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.324.7346.1153 (Published 11 May 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;324:1153
  1. Margie Peden ([email protected]), acting team leader,
  2. Adnan Hyder, assistant research professor
  1. Unintentional Injuries Prevention, Department of Injuries and Violence Prevention, World Health Organization, CH1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland
  2. Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Maryland, MD 21205, USA

    EDITOR—Road traffic crashes and their sequelae are a scourge in all societies, both developed and developing. Each year over a million people are killed in road traffic collisions worldwide and some 10 million people are injured or disabled by these events,1 predominantly in low and middle income countries.2

    Despite what is known about road traffic crashes and their health consequences, policymakers worldwide show little awareness of their contribution to the burden of disease; consequently they are neglected …

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