Fillers A memorable patient

Bridging medicine

BMJ 2002; 324 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.324.7341.823 (Published 06 April 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;324:823
  1. Kishor Choudhari, consultant neurosurgeon
  1. Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast

    In the early 1990s, as a registrar at J J Hospitals in Mumbai (Bombay), I had the experience of a lifetime. J J Hospitals was situated in a Muslim area of the city, and most of its catchment population were Muslim community whereas most of the doctors were Hindu. With trust between patients and doctors paramount, the different religious beliefs had never vitiated the congenial atmosphere at the hospital.

    Then, on 6 December 1992, some Hindu radicals demolished the Babari mosque at Ayodhya, igniting widespread riots. Fundamentalists in both communities set on each other—destroying shops, burning vehicles, and attacking individuals of the opposite faith. Hundreds were killed and thousands injured. The normally busy, vibrant city of Bombay, an epitome of religious harmony, was transformed into a virtual war zone, with seething hatred and distrust. Faced with the stupendous task …

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