Book Book

Encyclopedia of Birth Control

BMJ 2002; 324 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.324.7340.796 (Published 30 March 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;324:796
  1. Ann Furedi, director of communications
  1. British Pregnancy Advisory Service

    Ed Vern L Bullough

    ABC-CLIO, £55.95, pp 349

    ISBN 1 57607 1812

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    The term “birth control” is no longer commonly used in Britain. In these politically correct times it has been replaced with either the more specific “contraception” or the more general “family planning”—neither of which describes the aim of the exercise as well as “birth control.”


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    One of the reasons for the semantic shift has been the desire of modern health professionals to distance themselves from the eugenic assumptions of the early birth control movement. In the early decades of the last century birth control was seen as a means of …

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