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Yeast genome shares 50 genes with human diseases

BMJ 2002; 324 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.324.7335.441 (Published 23 February 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;324:441
  1. Susan Mayor
  1. London

    The genome for the latest organism to be sequenced—the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe—indicates that it is likely to be particularly useful for research into human diseases.

    The gene sequence published this week showed that 50 of the nearly 5000 genes were similar to genes associated with a range of human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, hereditary deafness, and type 2 diabetes; 23 of them were found to be related to human cancers (Nature 2002;415:871-80).

    S pombe is the sixth higher life form (eukaryote) to be sequenced, following S cerevisaie (budding or bakers' yeast), …

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