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Coming up roses

BMJ 2002; 324 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.324.7332.306 (Published 02 February 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;324:306
  1. Trevor Jackson (tjackson@bmj.com)
  1. BMJ

    Are things looking up for doctors?

    Who won the war of Rose's head? Both Tory and Labour politicians feel that they have scored vital points in what has perhaps been the most crucial recent battle over the most crucial public service in electoral terms. The war of Rose's head is the new war of Jennifer's ear—which erupted in 1992 when a Labour election broadcast used the case of a five year old girl who had waited months for an ear operation to highlight problems in the health service. Although Jennifer Bennett was not named in the broadcast, her case notes were leaked, and Labour stood accused of sacrificing patient confidentiality for party political purposes. The Tories went on to win the general election.

    The war of Rose's head concerns the case of 94 year old Rose Addis. Under the headline “Abandoned in casualty,” London's Evening Standard reported on 21 January that Mrs Addis had waited three days at the Whittington Hospital “caked in blood” after “gashing her head in a fall at home.” In …

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