Obituaries

John (Iain) Wylie CookIan Macdonald DingwallClara Jean FraserWilliam IngmanFrancis Stephen PerryZoë Christine RandallJoseph RobinsonJames Gordon SearleJohn Elphinstone UnderwoodWilliam Van EssenJames Meighan WallaceJohn Logan Wilson

BMJ 2001; 323 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.323.7320.1072 (Published 03 November 2001) Cite this as: BMJ 2001;323:1072

John (Iain) Wylie Cook


Embedded Image

Former general practitioner Alexandria, Dunbartonshire (b Alexandria 1915; q Glasgow 1939), d 18 August 2001. As a captain in the Royal Army Medical Corps during the second world war, he served mostly in north Africa where he wrote and produced shows for the troops. His 1945 script for Babes in the Desert survives to this day. In 1946 Iain started in practice in Alexandria with his cousin and in succession to his father. He helped see the practice through the birth of the NHS and a move from a home based to a surgery based practice. He also worked at the Vale of Leven Hospital and became involved in medical politics. Iain was made a fellow of the BMA and played a part in the design of multipractice health centres and the development of an appointment system that forms the basis of many systems in use in large surgeries today. In 1975, he retired to the shores of Loch Fyne, where he indulged his love of renovating and mucking about in boats. He leaves a wife, Sheila; and two daughters.

[David Duff]

Ian Macdonald Dingwall


Embedded Image

Former chief medical officer Texaco Trinidad Oil Company (b Peterhead 1922; q Aberdeen 1951), d 15 June 2001. He was the grandnephew of General Sir Hector Macdonald (“Fighting Mac of the Gordons”), who fought in the Afghan war and both Boer wars and who saved the British army from total destruction at the Battle of Omdurman. By 1941 Ian was himself an infantry officer and was wounded in Normandy before serving in Egypt and Palestine, reaching the rank of major at 23. He entered medicine in 1946 when 80% of the class were ex-services. After house jobs, he joined the colonial service in Barbados, before joining Texaco in Trinidad. The company employed more than 9000 people, and ran …

View Full Text

Sign in

Log in through your institution

Free trial

Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
Sign up for a free trial

Subscribe