Prevention of type 2 diabetes

BMJ 2001; 323 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.323.7319.997 (Published 27 October 2001)
Cite this as: BMJ 2001;323:997.1

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Health promotion helps no one

  1. Colin Guthrie, general practitioner (grey_triker@hotmail.com)
  1. 1448 Dumbarton Road, Glasgow G14 9DW
  2. Physical Activity and Nutrition Research Unit, School of Health Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia

    EDITOR—Narayan et al suggest that we use clinical and community based strategies to prevent type 2 diabetes.1 Over three years our small practice in Glasgow worked very hard to encourage healthy eating and exercise among our 2000 patients. We referred many patients to an exercise scheme, had a dietitian working in the practice, and organised health groups who met on a weekly basis where dietitian and doctor would weigh, encourage, motivate, and educate patients. Within a year almost half of my personal workload became this health promoting clinical input. In the end almost all of these patients required a continuous personal input to maintain their weight loss, regular exercise, or healthy eating, and it simply became unsustainable. Our energies were removed, and soon they all returned to their normal states.

    I learnt a lot …

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