European evaluation concludes third generation pills are associated with a small increase in risk of venous thromboembolism

BMJ 2001; 323 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.323.7317.828/c (Published 13 October 2001)
Cite this as: BMJ 2001;323:828.4

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  1. Susan Mayor
  1. London

    Women using “third generation” oral contraceptives have a small increase in risk of venous thromboembolism compared with those taking products containing levonorgestrel, but the overall risk is very low with any oral contraceptives, a report published last week by the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products has concluded.

    The agency report, produced by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products, was based on an ongoing review of the risk of venous thromboembolism. It began in 1995 after three independent epidemiological studies showed an increased risk of venous thromboembolism associated with the use of third generation combined oral contraceptives, containing desogestrel or gestodene, compared with combined pills …

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