Minerva

Minerva

BMJ 2001; 323 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.323.7309.408 (Published 18 August 2001) Cite this as: BMJ 2001;323:408

Breast feeding mothers avoid taking medication in case the drug gets into their milk. As antidepressants are usefully prescribed during this time, Minerva was interested to read that a study of three commonly used antidepressants found them safe during lactation (British Journal of Psychiatry 2001;179:163-6). No drug was detected in any infant exposed to paroxetine or fluvoxamine. Sertraline showed up in a quarter of babies exposed to it, although this tended to be in those whose mothers were taking high doses.

A study in the Journal of Clinical Pathology (2001;54:605-7) challenges the commonly held perception that a synovial biopsy in non-specific joint disease is a “last resort” when the synovial fluid is unhelpful. The authors conclude that the diagnostic usefulness of a biopsy is about the same as, and sometimes exceeds, that of a fluid. They were unable to predict, however, the cases in which a biopsy turned out to be more useful than the fluid.

Going for the dream job apparently induces one in three people to produce dishonest curriculum vitae. The most common exaggerations are about qualifications, leisure pursuits, and work experience (Financial Times 6 August 2001). A survey of 2000 people conducted by a television recruitment channel found …

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