Letters

Secondary prevention may help intermittent claudication

BMJ 2001; 322 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.322.7287.673/a (Published 17 March 2001) Cite this as: BMJ 2001;322:673
  1. A Vass (a.vass@ucl.ac.uk), London Academic Training Scheme academic fellow,
  2. G Leng, senior lecturer in public health,
  3. O Papacosta, research statistician,
  4. M Walker, senior lecturer in epidemiology,
  5. L Lennon, research assistant,
  6. P H Whincup, professor of cardiovascular epidemiology
  1. Department of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, London NW3 2PF

    EDITOR—We agree with Davies that intermittent claudication is underrecognised as a risk factor for coronary and cerebrovascular events, and that large proportions of patients with claudication are not receiving aspirin or cholesterol management.1 We have analysed data from the 20 year follow up of the British regional …

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