Letters

Birth events and cerebral palsy: facts were not presented clearly

BMJ 2001; 322 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.322.7277.50 (Published 06 January 2001) Cite this as: BMJ 2001;322:50
  1. Fiona Stanley, professor of paediatrics,
  2. Eve Blair, senior research officer,
  3. Eva Alberman, professor emeritus (e.d.alberman@mds.qmw.ac.uk)
  1. TVW Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, PO Box 855, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia
  2. Department of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, St Bartholomew's and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London EC1M 6BQ

    EDITOR—It is regrettable that a report of a conference in a scientific journal should have a headline such as the article by Silvert.1 Its tone belongs to the counterproductive adversarial approach of lawyers concerned with litigation. It is common ground that causes of the heterogeneous group that comprises the cerebral palsies include antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal events. The precise proportions contributed by each remain uncertain.

    The consensus statement reportedly attacked at the conference, far from denying …

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