Letters

Trial experience and problems of parental recollection of consent

BMJ 2001; 322 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.322.7277.49 (Published 06 January 2001) Cite this as: BMJ 2001;322:49
  1. Diana Elbourne, senior lecturer,
  2. Claire Snowdon, research fellow,
  3. Jo Garcia, social scientist,
  4. David Field, professor of neonatal medicine
  1. Medical Statistics Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT
  2. National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF
  3. Department of Child Health, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 5WW

    EDITOR—The Griffiths report refers to papers providing qualitative research evidence about informed consent in the neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation trial.15 As authors (CS, DE, JG) and principal investigator (DF) of this trial, we focus on one aspect of the report.

    The report states that several parents in North Staffordshire had a clear recollection of being asked to allow their children to have continuous negative extrathoracic pressure but no recollection of giving consent to randomisation in a research project (9.3.2). Our research with parents …

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