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‘Race’ and Childbirth

BMJ 2000; 321 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.321.7273.1418 (Published 2 December 2000)
Cite this as: BMJ 2000;321:1418.1

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  1. Kathryn Ehrich, research fellow
  1. Centre for the Study of Health, Sickness and Disablement, Brunel University

    Savita Katbamna

    Embedded Image Open University Press, £18.99, pp 144

    ISBN 0 335 19946 1

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    Meg Stacey, emeritus professor of sociology at the University of Warwick, recently commented with characteristic honesty that much of the early sociological research on childbirth was performed by people who wanted to make things better for people like themselves. They were unwittingly colluding in a failure to recognise how we make invisible the experiences, beliefs, and practices of “others”. This “blindness”, which academia and medicine have shared along with other British institutions, provides fertile ground for …

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