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Life is as much a pain as it ever was

BMJ 2000; 321 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.321.7265.897 (Published 07 October 2000) Cite this as: BMJ 2000;321:897

This article has a correction. Please see:

  1. Gary J Macfarlane, professor of epidemiology,
  2. John McBeth, research associate,
  3. Adam Garrow, research assistant,
  4. Alan J Silman, professor of rheumatic disease epidemiology
  1. Unit of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, School of Epidemiology and Health Sciences, The Medical School, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT
  2. Arthritis Research Campaign Epidemiology Unit, School of Epidemiology and Health Sciences, The Medical School, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT

    EDITOR—The article by Palmer et al shows that the reporting of back pain in the United Kingdom has increased during the past decade.1 This is potentially important because, despite rises in indirect measures such as sickness and invalidity benefit payments for back pain in the United Kingdom and elsewhere, there has been little evidence that back pain is actually becoming more common.2

    Area defined as low back in studies 3 4

    We conducted two …

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