Art Art

For most of it I have no words: genocide, landscape and memory

BMJ 2000; 321 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.321.7258.457/a (Published 12 August 2000) Cite this as: BMJ 2000;321:457
  1. Peter Chapman, Independent
  1. journalist

    Photographs by Simon Norfolk Imperial War Museum, London, until 28 August

    On 17 April 1975 the Khmer Rouge, led by Pol Pot, captured the city of Phnom Penh and so took complete control of Cambodia. It was, they declared, year zero. During the next four years, over one million Cambodians died as a result of malnutrition, torture, and forced labour. In Simon Norfolk's exhibition of photographs, the remains of the dead confront us with the fact of our own survival.

    Norfolk spent three years photographing sites of genocide or mass slaughter. Cambodia, Rwanda, Vietnam, Auschwitz, Ukraine, Dresden, and Armenia—it's a …

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