Letters

Misconceptions about tuberculosis among immigrants to the United States

BMJ 2000; 320 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.320.7251.1726/a (Published 24 June 2000) Cite this as: BMJ 2000;320:1726
  1. Susan T Cookson, chief (sgc0@cdc.gov)
  1. Migration Health Assessment Section, Division of Quarantine, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-03, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA

    EDITOR—Charatan's story in news extra about tuberculosis among foreign born people in the United States requires clarification.1 The term immigrant is not used accurately. An immigrant to the United States is a person who is admitted as a lawful permanent resident or who becomes a permanent resident while living there. About 400 000 people qualify in each category annually; about 70 000 refugees enter annually.2

    Arriving immigrants and refugees with chest radiographs suggesting possible current or old healed tuberculosis, fiscal years 1995-7, United States

    Within the Public Health Service, the Division …

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