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Scientists build a peptide to stop toxic shock syndrome

BMJ 2000; 320 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.320.7240.958 (Published 08 April 2000) Cite this as: BMJ 2000;320:958
  1. Judy Siegel-Itzkovich
  1. Jerusalem

    A potential weapon against the virulent strains of staphylococcal and streptococcal bacteria that produce toxic shock syndrome has been developed by Israeli researchers and has been found to be effective in mice.

    The research team, whose breakthrough is described in this month's Nature Medicine (2000;6:414-21) was headed by Raymond Kaempfer, professor of molecular virology at the Hebrew University-Hadassah faculty of medicine in Jerusalem. He and Dr Gila Arad, Revital Levy, and Dalia Hillman spent four years planning and building a synthetic peptide antagonist that blocks …

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