Fillers Endpiece

The internet may not be the biggest change in the past 150 years

BMJ 2000; 320 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.320.7238.846/a (Published 25 March 2000) Cite this as: BMJ 2000;320:846

If I place myself in 1900, and then look forward for 36 years, and backward for as many, I feel doubtful whether the changes made in the earlier times were not greater than anything I have seen since. I am speaking of changes in man's minds, and I cannot in my own time observe anything of greater consequence than the dethronement of ancient faith by natural science and historial criticism, and the transition from oligarchic to democratic representation. Yet the generation whose memories went back another 36 years had seen and felt changes surely as great: the political revolution of 1830, the economic and social revolution produced by the railway and the steamship, the founding of the great Dominions.

Footnotes

  • G M Young, Portrait of an Age: Victorian England. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1953 (second edition).

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