News

Saliva test could diagnose cancers

BMJ 2000; 320 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.320.7238.825 (Published 25 March 2000) Cite this as: BMJ 2000;320:825
  1. Abi Berger
  1. BMJ

    Looking for mitochondrial genetic mutations in bodily fluid could be a promising new way to detect cancers. David Sidransky and his team from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, have discovered that genetic mutations in mitochondrial cells from cancers are highly prevalent and easily detectable in urine, sputum, and bronchial secretions.

    Professor Sidransky believes that this observation could provide a powerful molecular marker for non-invasive detection of cancer (Science 2000;287:2017-9).

    Mitochondrial DNA is derived from …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Free trial

    Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
    Sign up for a free trial

    Subscribe