“Where name and image meet”—the argument for “adrenaline”

Jeffrey K Aronson
Table 2.

Pharmacopoeial names and the number (percentage) of times the names adrenaline and epinephrine have been used in bioscience titles or abstracts since 1965, by country of publication*

Country of publicationName in national pharmacopoeia or equivalentInstances of “adrenalin(e)”Instances of “epinephrin(e)”
AustraliaAdrenaline159 (85.0)28 (15.0)
United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, Wales)Adrenaline3573 (73.6)1 282 (26.4)
FranceAdrenaline453 (69.3)201 (30.7)
Scandinavia (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden)Adrenaline710 (68.5)327 (31.5)
SpainEpinefrina75 (65.2)40 (34.8)
ItalyAdrenalina233 (59.4)159 (40.6)
GermanyAdrenalinum 1485 (58.3)1 062 (41.7)
Rest of the world3372 (55.4)2 214 (36.4)
JapanEpinephrine441 (38.1)715 (61.9)
CanadaEpinephrine121 (28.7)301 (71.3)
United StatesEpinephrine1157 (9.8)10 609 (90.1)
  • * Papers (accessed on Medline) that used both adrenalin(e) and epinephrin(e) were excluded (they comprised under 1% of the total); the Medline records for 1965 are incomplete.

  • † No Nordic pharmacopoeia; Scandinavia follows the European Pharmacopoeia.

  • Deutsches Arzneibuch.