Letters

Smoking by young people

BMJ 1999; 319 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.319.7219.1268 (Published 06 November 1999) Cite this as: BMJ 1999;319:1268

Philip Morris USA also wants to reduce incidence of smoking by young people

  1. Carolyn Levy, senior vice president, Youth Smoking Prevention (Carolyn.J.Levy@pmusa.com)
  1. Philip Morris USA, New York, NY 10017-5592, USA
  2. Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Washington, DC, USA

    EDITOR—Novelli, president of the American activist group Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, unfairly characterised the efforts of Philip Morris USA to help prevent smoking by young people.1 I would like to set the record straight.

    We at Philip Morris USA share a common goal with members of the public health community: reducing the incidence of smoking by young people. One indication of my company's commitment to this effort is the creation of our youth smoking prevention department, whose sole goal is to help reduce underage use of tobacco. Our approach is integrated and comprehensive, combining communication and support for school based prevention programmes and community based programmes promoting positive youth development.

    We share the view of many experts that an integrated approach is the most effective way to reduce smoking by young people. By itself, of course, advertising is unlikely to reduce underage tobacco use. We do, however, believe that it can play an important part in …

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