Medicopolitical Digest

Juniors' pay offer will not mean a pay cutConsultants endorse system of revalidationHelping non-consultant career grade doctorsCharity calls for better service for minority ethnic groups

BMJ 1999; 319 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.319.7217.1140 (Published 23 October 1999) Cite this as: BMJ 1999;319:1140

Juniors' pay offer will not mean a pay cut

The vast majority of junior doctors will get an increase in pay as a result of the pay offer from the Department of Health (2 October, p 869)

In a series of questions and answers about the deal—the details are still being negotiated between the Junior Doctors Committee's representatives and the health department—the JDC secretariat explains that those doctors working most intensively during the out of hours period will get the largest increase in pay. The system is designed to ensure that there will be no losers but the health department will review any unusual individual cases where pay protection might be needed.

There will be an incentive for trusts to limit working hours because by year three of the proposal—it is due to start in October 2000—posts which are not complying with the new deal will be prohibitively expensive.

Until now the negotiations have focused on the pricing of the different bands in the new contract. Some of the issues still to be considered include the exact criteria for the different bands which make up the contract; mechanisms for resolving disputes …

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