Editorials

HIV and tuberculosis in the Commonwealth

BMJ 1999; 319 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.319.7217.1086 (Published 23 October 1999) Cite this as: BMJ 1999;319:1086

Heads of governments can learn from one another's successes

  1. Angus Nicoll, consultant epidemiologist (ANicoll@phls.nhs.uk),
  2. Peter Godfrey-Faussett, senior lecturer
  1. HIV and STD Division, Public Health Laboratory Service, London NW9 5EQ
  2. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT

    The countries of the Commonwealth share more than a common heritage of British rule. They also share a disproportionate burden of communicable disease, particularly HIV and tuberculosis. Yet there are also considerable success stories within Commonwealth countries in controlling these diseases—and these too should be shared. The Commonwealth heads of government meeting in Durban in November provides such an opportunity.

    Though Commonwealth countries represent only 29.5% of the global population, they account for 60.5% of cases of HIV and 42.3% of those of tuberculosis (see figure and fuller table on www.bmj.com).1 2 The …

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