Letters

The end of the heparin pump?

BMJ 1999; 319 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.319.7209.575a (Published 28 August 1999) Cite this as: BMJ 1999;319:575

Dosage regimens for low molecular weight heparins differ

  1. Mark Lloyd, senior registrar ([email protected])
  1. Department of Rheumatology, St Thomas's Hospital, London SE1 7EH
  2. Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Gwent NP9 2UB
  3. North and East Devon Health Authority, Exeter EX1 1QT
  4. Wessex Institute for Health Research and Development, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 7PX
  5. Department of Cardiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH3 9YW

    EDITOR—Grubb et al's editorial reviewed the use of subcutaneous heparin; the advantages in efficacy and simplicity in the treatment of thromboembolic disease and angina now seem clear.1 A potential difficulty, which is clear in the everyday use of these agents, is the differing dosages required. Because the agents are commonly prescribed in a busy on-call setting, calculation errors are also more likely to occur. Five agents are mentioned, of which three are available in the United Kingdom. The table shows the dosage regimens for these agents.

    View this table:

    Dosage regimens for low molecular weight (LMW) heparins available in United Kingdom for treatment of thromboembolism and unstable angina

    Other agents with similar indications will probably be licensed. Perhaps it would be useful for regulatory bodies to introduce a uniform system of equivalent doses, similar to that used in insulin prescription.

    References

    1. 1.

    Epidural haematoma may occur after epidural and spinal regional anaesthesia

    1. Christopher C Callander, consultant anaesthetist ([email protected])
    1. Department of Rheumatology, St Thomas's Hospital, London SE1 7EH
    2. Royal Gwent Hospital, Newport, Gwent NP9 2UB
    3. North and East Devon Health Authority, Exeter EX1 1QT
    4. Wessex Institute for Health Research and Development, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 7PX
    5. Department of Cardiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH3 9YW

      EDITOR—In their editorial Grubb et al reviewed the advantages of low molecular weight heparins over unfractionated heparin in a variety of clinical situations and pointed out that they …

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