Letters

Labour care of women with HIV infection

BMJ 1999; 319 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.319.7206.381a (Published 07 August 1999) Cite this as: BMJ 1999;319:381

Article did not highlight current guidelines

  1. Graham P Taylor, honorary senior registrar in genitourinary and HIV medicine (g.p.taylor@ic.ac.uk),
  2. E G Hermione Lyall, lecturer,
  3. Gareth Tudor-Williams, senior lecturer,
  4. Lesley Regan, professor,
  5. John Smith, consultant obstetrician
  1. Department of Genitourinary Medicine and Communicable Diseases, Imperial College School of Medicine at St Mary's and St Mary's Hospital NHS Trust, London W2 1NY
  2. Department of Paediatrics, Imperial College School of Medicine at St Mary's and St Mary's Hospital NHS Trust
  3. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Imperial College School of Medicine at St Mary's and St Mary's Hospital NHS Trust
  4. Department of Obstetrics, Swansea NHS Trust, Swansea SA2 QA
  5. Department of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London SW10 9NH

    EDITOR—In the section on women with HIV infection in their article for the ABC of labour care, Chamberlain and Steer make several controversial and unreferenced statements.1 The key message recognises the importance of screening pregnant women for HIV infection to enable appropriate care to protect the baby; it makes no mention, however, of maternal health, preferring to highlight staff protection. In obstetrics and midwifery it would be preferable to emphasise the need to practise universal precautions to protect against any transmissible infections rather than selective practice, which puts staff and patients at risk and may stigmatise women with HIV or other infections.

    The authors state that “women known to be HIV positive should be taking zidovudine and protease inhibitors during the second half of pregnancy.” The British HIV Association has written guidelines on prescribing for HIV infection in pregnancy and recommends triple antiretroviral therapy (usually zidovudine, another nucleoside analogue, and either a protease inhibitor …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Subscribe