Letters

The paradoxes of genetically modified foods

BMJ 1999; 318 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.318.7199.1694a (Published 19 June 1999) Cite this as: BMJ 1999;318:1694

Protection of the public health should underpin all decisions

  1. Emma Plugge, Senior registrar in public health medicine ([email protected])
  1. Buckinghamshire Health Authority, Verney House, Aylesbury HP19 3ET

    EDITOR—In his editorial on genetically modified foods Dixon eschews certain important issues.1

    Firstly, he does not point out that, although scientists claim this technology will help to feed the world's burgeoning population, food production is not the problem. There are enough natural resources for us all to be fed: inequity of food distribution results in the starvation of millions in poorer nations.

    Secondly, he dismisses the campaigners who draw parallels between bovine spongiform encephalopathy and genetically modified foods. The connection between the two in …

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