Letters

Authors' words foster stigmatisation of commercial sex workers in India

BMJ 1999; 318 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.318.7197.1559 (Published 05 June 1999) Cite this as: BMJ 1999;318:1559
  1. Padmaja Patnaik, Epidemiologist (p_patnaik@hotmail.com),
  2. Rajesh Gupta, Candidate. (guptar1@biomed.med.yale.edu),
  3. Helen Lambert, Senior lecturer in medical anthropology. (helen.lambert@lshtm.ac.uk)
  4. On behalf of members of the “Public Health India” internet discussion group
  1. Bureau of Health Statistics, Research and Evaluation, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Boston MA 02108, USA
  2. Yale University Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, New Haven, CT 06520, USA
  3. Department of Public Health and Policy, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7

    EDITOR—The Indian component of the HIV/AIDS pandemic has recently gained international attention because of the alarming rate at which it is taking hold in this populous part of the world. What makes the case of HIV/AIDS in a country like India especially difficult is that it is caught in a complex web of sociocultural mores that can act as serious deterrents to …

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