Personal Views

Anything else, sir?

BMJ 1999; 318 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.318.7196.1497 (Published 29 May 1999) Cite this as: BMJ 1999;318:1497
  1. Anna Eleri Livingstone, general practitioner
  1. east London

    Yes, condoms supplied in general practice. I was never quite sure whether pure altruism led general practitioners to support gents' hairdressers, by refusing the possibility of prescribing condoms, when women's contraception went on prescription at the beginning of the 1970s. Yes, I am a veteran of WACC (Women's Abortion and Contraception Campaign), which fought, alongside its more genteel sister organisations, for better contraceptive access for women in the early years of the women's liberation movement. I suppose we saw the annual contraceptive item of service claim in British general practice as part of the paraphernalia of victory. But what about the men, and the rubbers, condoms, “johnnies,” French letters? In those days we …

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