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Jackson Pollock

BMJ 1999; 318 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.318.7186.816 (Published 20 March 1999) Cite this as: BMJ 1999;318:816
  1. Sean A Spence, locum consultant psychiatrist.
  1. London

    Tate Gallery, London, until 6 June

    Jackson Pollock was the quintessential “action painter.” A muscular man stooping over canvasses he'd laid on the ground, he dripped and flung paint in the white T shirt and faded jeans immortalised in iconic portraits. He had appropriated this “uniform” long before Bruce Springsteen wore it. Indeed, his very “Americaness” prompted claims that he was not a great painter at all but a stooge for the New York art scene elite, set up to rival the European tradition, in particular Picasso. Certainly, it is difficult to …

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