Medicopolitical Digest

Junior doctors advised on self regulationN Ireland's GPs propose “third way”Juniors repeat calls for study leave improvementsRoyal college calls for NICE to have a broader role

BMJ 1998; 317 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.317.7164.1021 (Published 10 October 1998) Cite this as: BMJ 1998;317:1021

Junior doctors advised on self regulation

In guidance for junior doctors on professional self regulation the Junior Doctors Committee emphasises that as junior doctors are in training any professional regulation should involve the educational structure as well as the management structure of their employment. Furthermore, junior doctors who are concerned about a colleague's performance must be confident that they will not suffer discrimination if they report their concerns.

The guidance sets out three stages on self regulation. In the first instance concerns about a junior doctor should be raised with the consultant for whom the doctor works. Juniors raising concerns should seek advice from the clinical tutor, colleagues in other departments, the college tutor, or the clinical director. The consultant will tell the junior that he or she is the subject of concern. Most problems will be resolved at this stage and no further action would be needed.

If the matter cannot be resolved it should be referred to the medical director of the employing authority or trust and the appropriate postgraduate dean notified. It might be necessary to set up a professional …

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