Fillers Life long frustration

Tea for two and two for tea

BMJ 1998; 317 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.317.7162.874 (Published 26 September 1998) Cite this as: BMJ 1998;317:874
  1. Lee-Suan Teh, consultant rheumatologist
  1. Blackburn

    Over 20 years ago, when I was reading Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet in school, I did not realise that Juliet's lament, “What's in a name? that which we call a rose. By any other name would smell as sweet,” would also conjure up such bittersweet experiences for me.

    I was green and timid when I entered Aberdeen University Medical School straight from cosmopolitan Malaysia, petrified that I would have difficulty following the lectures and understanding the patients. Scottish names were new to me—like an entirely different language. And as I stumbled over the pronunciation of the names of fellow classmates, they equally had difficulty over my Chinese name.

    “I'm Lee-Suan Teh,” I volunteered again, without much hope that it would be remembered. “Yes, Suan, pronounced like swan and Teh, like the River Tay,” I …

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