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Human genome project to complete ahead of schedule

BMJ 1998; 317 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.317.7162.834a (Published 26 September 1998) Cite this as: BMJ 1998;317:834
  1. Abi Berger, science correspondent
  1. BMJ

    The human genome project is all set to present the fully sequenced human genome in 2003, two years earlier than expected. A draft version of the genome which should contain up to 90% of the total genetic information, is expected to be ready by 2001.

    The human genome project is an international collaboration of research, and the intention of the project is to map out the entire genetic blueprint (genome) of the human being. The benefit of sequencing the entire human genome is that it will give scientists a complete molecular understanding of human beings, and the genetic basis from which humans have evolved, in addition to helping scientists understand what happens when something goes wrong or when diseases interfere with normal functioning. It will also provide pharmaceutical companies with new therapeutic targets.

    The draft version of the genome will contain relatively raw information. It should hopefully contain, however, the genes that are generally considered most important to biologists …

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