Television gives a distorted picture of birth as well as death

BMJ 1998; 317 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.317.7153.284b (Published 25 July 1998)
Cite this as: BMJ 1998;317:284.3

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  1. Sarah Clement
  1. Department of General Practice, Guy's and St Thomas's United Medical and Dental School, London SE11 6SP

    EDITOR—Crayford et al have analysed death rates in televised soap operas.1Similar, but less systematic, observations were made by Karpf a decade ago. Discussing American daytime soap operas, Karpf commented that “in 1977 there were only two cases of cancer on soap operas, neither of them fatal. … Instead they die by being hit by a truck, being pushed downstairs, being shot at, or tumbling out of aeroplanes. Homicide is the soap opera's number one killer … and …

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