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HIV treatment in children brought into line with that in adults

BMJ 1997; 315 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.315.7113.899g (Published 11 October 1997) Cite this as: BMJ 1997;315:899
  1. Deborah Josefson
  1. San Francisco

    The treatment of children with AIDS should be brought into line with that of adults, according to new draft guidelines from the United States's Department of Health and Human Services.

    Historically, because of toxicity and dosage concerns, children with AIDS have been denied the potent drugs routinely prescribed to adults with AIDS. Consensus has been growing that this relative neglect is unfair, especially with the advent of triple therapy with antiretrovirals and protease inhibitors that can lower viral loads to undetectable levels.

    Most children acquire HIV during the perinatal period, a time when an infant's immune system is still developing. Maternal antibodies …

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