Letters

Mental health emergencies

BMJ 1997; 315 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.315.7112.884 (Published 04 October 1997) Cite this as: BMJ 1997;315:884

Details of studies of zuclopenthixol acetate are needed

  1. Evandro Coutinho, Lecturer in epidemiologya,
  2. Mark Fenton, Research nurseb,
  3. Colin Campbell, Consultant psychiatristb,
  4. Anthony David, Professorc
  1. a FIOCRUZ/UERJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,
  2. b South Warwickshire Mental Health Services Trust, Warwick CV35 7EE,
  3. c Institute of Psychiatry, London SE5 8AZ
  4. d Dewsbury, Yorkshire
  5. e St James's University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF
  6. f Psychiatric Intensive Treatment Unit, Lambeth Healthcare NHS Trust, London SW9 9NT,
  7. g United Medical and Dental Schools, St Thomas's Hospital, London SE1 7EH
  8. h Maudsley Hospital, London SE5 8AZ

    Editor—The issue of mental health emergencies is rarely addressed. As we are currently working with the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group to produce a systematic review on the use of zuclopenthixol acetate for acutely disturbed people, we were interested to see that Zerrin Atakan and Teifion Davies recommend its use in certain circumstances.1 Despite our best efforts at searching electronic databases such as Biological Abstracts, the Cochrane Library, Embase, LILIACS, Medline, PsycLIT, and PSYNDEX and many conference proceedings, and contacting Lundbeck, we have found only three fully published controlled clinical trials from which data can be extracted.2 3 4 The paucity of studies may be due to the great difficulty in carrying out trials of emergency treatment in psychiatry, but the fact that all three identified studies give equivocal results suggests that the recommendation of zuclopenthixol acetate in preference to other treatments may be premature. We would welcome any information that the authors or others may have on any controlled clinical trials, published or unpublished, relating to this issue.

    References

    1. 1.
    2. 2.
    3. 3.
    4. 4.

    Patients need to be monitored when given rapid tranquillisation

    1. Ed Walker ([email protected]), Staff grade practitioner in accident and emergencyd
    1. a FIOCRUZ/UERJ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,
    2. b South Warwickshire Mental Health Services Trust, Warwick CV35 7EE,
    3. c Institute of Psychiatry, London SE5 8AZ
    4. d Dewsbury, Yorkshire
    5. e St James's University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF
    6. f Psychiatric Intensive Treatment Unit, Lambeth Healthcare NHS Trust, London SW9 9NT,
    7. g United Medical and Dental Schools, St Thomas's Hospital, London SE1 7EH
    8. h Maudsley Hospital, London SE5 8AZ

      Editor—Zerrin Atakan and Teifion Davies have a box listing precautions with rapid tranquillisation in their article in the ABC of mental health.1 With the use of the doses suggested, some patients …

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