Medicine And Books

Gene Therapy

BMJ 1997; 314 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.314.7086.1057 (Published 05 April 1997) Cite this as: BMJ 1997;314:1057
  1. Sir David Weatherall, honorary director
  1. Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford

    Ed N R Lemoine, D N Cooper / BIOS Scientific Publishers, £60, pp 368 / ISBN 1 85996 205 X

    There must be few fields of medical research that have gained so much publicity (and notoriety) during their early gestation than what is still rather hopefully called “gene therapy.” Its research papers regularly make headline news in the national press, two journals with almost identical names are devoted entirely to it, and several accounts of its history have already been written. Yet it is still to produce a genuine clinical success story.

    Recently, however, gene therapy has come under sharper scrutiny and a more balanced view of its potential is emerging. Last year a working party, established by the National Institutes of Health and chaired by Stuart Orkin, examined progress in the subject and attempted to establish some guidelines for its …

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