Letters

Prescribing incentive scheme for non-fundholding general practices

BMJ 1996; 313 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.313.7070.1483b (Published 07 December 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;313:1483

Tailoring a scheme to individual practices is more effective

  1. Philip Rutledge
  1. Senior medical adviser Lothian Health, Edinburgh EG8 9RS

    EDITOR,—D N Bateman and colleagues' paper adds to the evidence that incentives to general practitioners are an important component of a strategy to change doctors' prescribing patterns.1 It is interesting to compare the results of the scheme in the Northern region in England, described by Bateman and colleagues, with those of the rational prescribing payment scheme in Lothian, Scotland. Both schemes contained financial incentives for non-fundholding practices and led to savings in prescribing. The Lothian scheme consisted of …

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