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Changing of the cancer guard

BMJ 1996; 313 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.313.7070.1428a (Published 07 December 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;313:1428

The end of 1996 was always going to be different for the New South Wales Cancer Council. Last year the council distributed over $A1.2m (£0.6m; $0.9m) in new research grants, making it the largest sponsor of cancer research in the state and the state's largest health charity. A new act passed in October 1995 radically restructured its board. Instead of being dominated by research scientists nominated by the three medical schools and the Australian Medical Association, the new act requires nine members, of whom at least four are to be women and two medically qualified cancer specialists.

Nominations for the new board were vetted by the Minister for Health's office, and several people highly experienced in cancer research were rejected. A group including a trade union …

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