Career Focus

Briefing

BMJ 1996; 313 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.313.7068.3 (Published 23 November 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;313:S3-7068

Informal mentoring is haphazard and likely to favour those in existing networks, but formalised schemes can have far reaching and positive consequences for organisations, according to a recent report. Internal mentoring, which matches two employees at different strata within large organisations in an informal relationship, is a cost effective way of developing skills and helps mentees to discover unwritten rules. The report also discusses external mentoring, increasingly used in the professions, by senior executives, and in business/community links with young people, ex-prisoners, and people from ethnic minorities. Mentoring Schemes IDS Study 613, November 1996, Incomes Data Services. London 1996.

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