Medicopolitical Digest

BMA gives evidence to review bodyNew groups will advise on medical manpowerUniversities are losing clinical staffIsolated areas need help to provide out of hours careGPs are concerned about checks on medical records

BMJ 1996; 313 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.313.7060.823 (Published 28 September 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;313:823
  1. Linda Beecham

    BMA gives evidence to review body

    The BMA has given evidence to the Doctors' and Dentists' Review Body for the 1997 pay round, estimating that doctors need a pay increase of 53% to restore their comparative position to that of 1980 (p 769).

    The BMA has expressed concern at the problem of translating the NHS pay award for clinical academic staff—they have not yet received the 1996 award—and the review body has been asked formally to recommend to the government increases for clinical academics in line with NHS doctors.

    Junior hospital doctors are concerned about the discretionary nature of the top two points on the specialist registrar scale and want the review body to base the scale on the full range of registrar and senior registrar pay, but with seven incremental points. They have called for full shift additional duty hour rates to be paid to those doctors working full shift intensity on on call rotas or partial shifts.

    On behalf of doctors working in public health medicine and community health the BMA has asked the review body to maintain the link between the salary scales of clinical consultants and consultants in public health medicine; revise the supplements payable to directors of public health to take account of the major changes in the number and size of health authorities; recognise the increased workload resulting from the drastic shortfall in consultant posts in public health medicine; recommend an increase in the out of hours supplement for trainees in public health medicine; and maintain existing relativities between the salary scales of community health doctors and …

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