Medicine And Books

Best books on endocrinology: a personal choice

BMJ 1996; 312 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.312.7047.1681 (Published 29 June 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;312:1681
  1. Jean Ginsburg

    Forty years ago, therapeutic options for the endocrinologist were limited. Patients with thyroid dysfunction were often referred to surgeons, and reproductive endocrinology was not even considered a subspecialty. Scientific respectability came with the development of radioimmunoassay and accurate hormonal assay, and the synthesis of new drugs has revolutionised the attitude of clinicians to such patients.

    Endocrinology has now infiltrated gynaecology, removing not only infertility but disturbances of menstruation, dysmenorrhoea and treatment of the menopause from the gynaecologist, and pushed its tentacles into neurological practice. The ability of bromocriptine to shrink pituitary tumours and the development of octreotide with its multiple inhibitory effects have pioneered medical treatment for many tumours hitherto considered inoperable.

    Textbooks

    * Clinical Endocrinology. Ed G M Besser, M G Thorner (£90.) Times Mirror, 1994. ISBN 1 56375 5521.

    ***Endocrinology. 3rd edn. Ed L De Groot. (£346.) Saunders, 1995, ISBN 0 7216 1262 4.

    The scientific and therapeutic explosion has not, unfortunately, been paralleled by adequate choice in reasonably priced textbooks. The cost of the well …

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