Choice

Editor's choice

BMJ 1996; 312 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.312.7039.0 (Published 04 May 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;312:0

The Universal Stranger British blood donors in the late 1960s cited notions of the “universal stranger”- someone who might be in need and deserved to be helped - to explain their decision to give blood. “People gave blood out of a feeling of general social obligation,” says Ann Oakley in her editorial on what has been happening in the 25 years since Richard Tittmus described this “gift relationship” …

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