Letters

Prenatal and postnatal prevalence of Turner's syndrome

BMJ 1996; 312 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.312.7038.1100 (Published 27 April 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;312:1100

No scientific evidence for study's conclusions

  1. Claes Lundsteen,
  2. Karen Brondum Nielsen,
  3. Peter K A Jensen,
  4. Gert Bruun Petersen,
  5. Kirsten Rasmussen
  1. Laboratory director Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospital Rigshospitalet, DK-2100 Copenhagen (null set), Denmark
  2. Head of department Chromosome Laboratory, John F Kennedy Institute, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark
  3. Head of department Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospital Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark
  4. Head of department Department of Clinical Genetics, Vejle Hospital, DK-7100 Vejle, Denmark
  5. Head of department Department of Clinical Genetics, University Hospital Odense, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark

    EDITOR,—The members of the board of the Danish Cytogenetic Central Register were surprised to read the paper by Claus Hojbjerg Gravholt and colleagues on the prenatal and postnatal prevalence of Turner's syndrome.1 The authors have seriously misinterpreted the register's data.

    The purpose of the paper was to study the prevalence of Turner's syndrome in Denmark and to assess the validity of prenatal diagnosis. The authors attempted to do this by using data on Turner's syndrome in the Danish …

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