Medicopolitical Digest

Junior doctors deplore phasing of review body awardMinisterial group on new deal should be recalledGPs will discuss their core servicesPatients get guidance on living wills

BMJ 1996; 312 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.312.7035.914 (Published 06 April 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;312:914
  1. Linda Beecham

    Junior doctors deplore phasing of review body award

    Representatives of junior hospital doctors have unanimously deplored the government's decision to phase the implementation of the 1996 award of the Review Body on Doctors' and Dentists' Remuneration. Senior registrars, registrars, and specialist registrars were awarded a 5.3% increase and senior house officers and house officers a 6.8% increase from 1 April but 1% has been withheld until 1 December. The higher award for junior grades was made partly to compensate for a reduction in the rates for class 3 additional duty hours of 2.5% to 50% of basic pay.

    The Junior Doctors Committee welcomed the fact that the awards have partly addressed the relative deterioration in the pay of training grade doctors but at its recent meeting it also criticised the government for not funding the awards in full and insisting that they will have to be funded, in part, from local efficiency savings. “Hospitals will have to take our pay increases from patient care,” according to Dr Edwin Borman, an anaesthetic senior registrar in Birmingham. “It is quite wrong that the government is allowing hospitals to squeeze the service.”

    The representative from the General Medical Services Committee, Dr Ian Banks, pointed to the differential in pay—as much as £7000—between the salary of general registrars and hospital registrars. The review body had not accepted that there was a recruitment crisis in general practice. Specialist registrars should have automatic increments.

    The JDC also deplored “anything other than the automatic implementation” of the salaries of doctors in the new specialist registrar grade. The review body recommended …

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