Editorials

My child's just knocked out a front tooth

BMJ 1996; 312 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.312.7030.526 (Published 02 March 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;312:526
  1. Anthony S Blinkhorn,
  2. Iain C Mackie
  1. Professor and honorary consultant in paediatric dentistry Senior lecturer and honorary consultant in paediatric dentistry University of Manchester Dental Hospital, Higher Cambridge Street, Manchester M15 6FH

    Urgent treatment can save the tooth and the smile

    Despite continuing improvements in oral health one in four children in Britain suffer some form of injury to their front teeth.1 Fortunately the clinical and technological advances made recently in dentistry will ensure that most of these children keep their smiles.

    One type of dental trauma demands immediate action to ensure a successful result: when one or more adult teeth is knocked completely out of the mouth. If these teeth are put back into the appropriate socket there is a very good chance that they will be retained.2 Medical practitioners in accident and emergency departments or in general practice will often be the first point of contact for advice and care. They may be uncertain what to …

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