Letters

In Finland anticoagulant treatment is monitored by general practitioners

BMJ 1996; 312 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.312.7022.52b (Published 06 January 1996) Cite this as: BMJ 1996;312:52
  1. K Eskola,
  2. I Virjo,
  3. M Isokoski,
  4. Pirjo Aittobiemi,
  5. H Kurunmaki,
  6. A Latva-Nevala,
  7. M Paloneva,
  8. A-M Wallin,
  9. M Viitaniemi,
  10. S Ylinen,
  11. S Ohman
  1. (senior lecturer in general practice), (acting assistant professor of general practice), (professor of primary health care), Department of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; (general practitioner), Health Centre, Seinajoki; (general practitioner), Health Centre, Kurikka; (chief physician), Health Centre, Seinajoki; (general practitioner), Health Centre, Vaasa; (general practitioner), Health Centre, Oravainen; (chief physician), Health Centre, Seinajoki; (general practitioner), Health Centre, Ahtari; (chief physician), Health Centre, Vaasa

    EDITOR,—C M Sudlow and colleagues emphasise the importance of an understanding of “the whole package of care” when new research evidence concerning the effect of anticoagulant treatment in preventing strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation is applied to everyday work.1 In their commentary on the article K G Sweeney and colleagues are worried about complications of the treatment and about underanticoagulation.1 2

    In Finland anticoagulant treatment is monitored by general practitioners in primary health care. In some cases they also start the treatment. The country thus has a system that Sweeney et …

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