Medicine And Books

Stress, Catecholamines, and Cardiovascular Disease

BMJ 1995; 311 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.311.7019.1580a (Published 09 December 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;311:1580
  1. Morris J Brown, professor of clinical pharmacology
  1. University of Cambridge

    David S Goldstein Oxford University Press, pounds sterling60, pp 539 ISBN 0 19 506538 7

    “Stress is like obscenity. I cannot define it, but I know it when I see it.” The opening quote of David Goldstein's book proves remarkably apposite for a text that draws both its literary and scientific strength from its scholarly mix of quotations and descriptions of catecholamine biology in cardiovascular disease. Just when general readers might themselves be sinking in the flux of catecholamine synthesis or metabolism, they are rescued by a tongue in cheek apologia for the biblical practice of trial by ordeal.

    The medical interest in the topic lies in the scope for either explaining diseases in which …

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