Medicine And Books

Patient Controlled Analgesia

BMJ 1995; 311 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.311.7016.1379 (Published 18 November 1995) Cite this as: BMJ 1995;311:1379
  1. David Rowbotham

    Edward Welchew BMJ Publishing Group, pounds sterling16.95, pp 133 ISBN 0 7279 0860 X

    Our approach to managing postoperative pain has changed fundamentally over the past decade. Previously, most patients were fortunate if they received two or three doses of intramuscular opioid after major surgery. This despite numerous publications describing the excessive incidence of severe pain after surgery. There were probably two catalysts for change. Firstly, the report of the Royal Colleges of Anaesthetists and Surgeons on Pain After Surgery was published in 1991. It recommended a change in our attitude to postoperative pain, improved education, and the safe introduction of new pain management techniques into British hospitals. In general this was well received, and most hospitals have responded to it.

    The second factor …

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